Illuminated River slider image
Illuminated River slider image
Illuminated River slider image
Illuminated River slider image
Illuminated River slider image
Illuminated River slider image
Illuminated River slider image
Illuminated River slider image
Illuminated River slider image
Illuminated River slider image
Illuminated River slider image
Illuminated River slider image
Illuminated River slider image
Illuminated River slider image
Illuminated River slider image

Illuminated River

with Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands

Working with New York artist Leo Villareal and renowned London architects Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands, we are enlivening 15 bridges on the Thames with dynamic lighting. Covering 2.5 miles in length, it will be the longest public art commission in the world.

As well as technically realising Villareal’s artistic vision for the bridges, Atelier Ten are developing a lighting solution that both minimises energy usage and spill light. The river is home to over 100 species of fish and numerous species of birds and bats which could potentially be disturbed by light. One of our key aims is to ensure careful control of the bridge lighting to avoid any disturbance to this diverse and rich ecosystem.

Our involvement in the initial stages has been to carry out an innovative and extensive luminance survey of the existing bridges and their surroundings. We are using this to develop recommendations for target light levels for each bridge to ensure the bridges are each lit to an appropriate level tailored to their surroundings and neighbouring iconic landmarks. In turn, this target light level will inform the selection of lighting equipment and ensure minimum energy usage and spill of light.

Our luminance surveys covered the entire length of the river between Albert Bridge and Tower Bridge. For such an extensive study we had to develop an inventive solution. We used specialist analysis software and a calibrated SLR camera to provide calibrated luminance plots from hundreds of photographs which we took during night time surveys along the river banks. We pieced together the calibrated photographs to provide a complete record of the brightness distribution along both banks of the Thames.

One of the first milestones on this project was to secure planning – no mean feat, as the team submitted 30 planning applications and 18 applications for listed building consent. We produced technical lighting reports for each application, demonstrating the measures undertaken to ensure the proposed lighting will be carefully controlled and sensitive to its environment.