Projects that moved the dial

Five years ago, we published “Invisible Architecture”, celebrating a quarter-century of Atelier Ten and highlighting so many projects that we are proud of. Picking up from where the book left off, we’ll be counting up to our 30th birthday in October with recent projects that have moved the dial.

Stay tuned in on Instagram and on LinkedIn for the countdown!

 


Southbank by Beulah

Southbank by Beulah

Soon to be the Southern Hemisphere’s tallest tower, UNStudio and Cox Architecture’s Southbank by Beulah pushes the boundaries of skyscraper design prioritising health and wellness with a particular focus on biomimicry.

Atelier Ten have worked on the project from the initial competition winning design ideas through to the successful planning approval. Our team have been integral to developing the project’s keen focus on healthy urban environments, ultra-efficient building systems, connected communities, resilience and future readiness. To facilitate the delivery of this vision Atelier Ten have developed an ambitious sustainability brief for the project based on robust proof of concept analysis and modelling during the concept design stage.

  
  

Unisphere

Unisphere

United Therapeutic’s new headquarters is the one of the largest site net zero energy commercial buildings in the U.S. The one-of-a-kind building includes a high performance envelope, mixed-mode ventilation, and a quartermile-long underground labyrinth.

To support the project’s net-zero energy goal, Atelier Ten worked closely with the design team to integrate passive design strategies including a natural ventilation system with a labyrinth. The labyrinth utilizes thermal mass to passively moderate temperatures within the atrium without relying on mechanical conditioning.

    
  
  

Tower Hamlets Town Hall

Tower Hamlets Town Hall

Tower Hamlets Town Hall, with AHMM, heralds the consolidation of local government services in one accessible location in the heart of the constituency. The ultimate adaptive reuse project, the team’s designs restore and repurpose a Grade II listed former Royal London Hospital building, parts of which date to 1757.

The design of the building aims to balance the competing demands of function, comfort and energy use by selecting systems that are effective and efficient. Given the building geometry and intended occupant density, mechanical ventilation and comfort cooling systems are proposed throughout.

    
  
  

Design Building

Design Building

The John W. Olver Design Building is a 2020 AIA COTE Top Ten Award winner and when completed it was the largest cross-laminated timber (CLT) academic building in the United States. Atelier Ten guided the environmental and lighting design for this extraordinary, LEED Gold interdisciplinary center.

The skylighted Commons features a long-span wood-steel “zipper” truss system and provides an inviting gathering space. The architectural lighting system accents the distinctive wood and concrete enclosure, automatically responding to daylight levels to enhance visual enjoyment and energy efficiency.

With an emphasis on visual and thermal comfort, the high-performance envelope ensures optimal daylighting, views, and insulation.

 
  

Prince and Princess of Wales Hospice

Prince and Princess of Wales Hospice

Nord Architecture’s award-winning Prince and Princess of Wales Hospice brings 21st century hospice care to the people of Glasgow, a major step forward in the provision of palliative care services, providing the Hospice with the flexibility to develop and improve their services.

Our fire engineers, through intelligent design, have created a domestic feel to the building allowing accommodation to be accessed directly from lounge areas.

Computer simulation helped to provide a services design with several low or zero carbon strategies where reduced running cost and appropriate capital expenditure is in line with a charitable trust.
 
  

 

Woolbeding Glass House + Alpine House

Woolbeding Glass House + Alpine House

Designed 15 years apart, these two “jewel boxes” are a cut above your typical greenhouse. Alpine House, with Wilkinson Eyre, was completed in 2005 and included one of our early labyrinths. Woolbeding Glass House, by Heatherwick Studio, features kinetic sepals that will open and close to provide natural ventilation.

Heatherwick Studio’s concept is a kinetic glasshouse featuring structural petals that can open and close. These allow air to be brought in naturally in summer, while maximising sunlight exposure. In winter, the petals can be closed, providing a heated environment. The glasshouse will provide a home for flora found along the Silk Road.

  

 

Illuminated river

Illuminated River

Phase two of Illuminated River, with Leo Villareal and LDS Architects has started on site. When fully complete, this project will be the longest public art project in the world and our careful work on the lighting design will reduce light pollution and minimise energy use.

The river is home to over 100 species of fish. Current spill light into the river is quite high and one of our key aims is to ensure careful control of the bridge lighting to avoid any disturbance to this diverse and rich ecosystem. We carried out an innovative and extensive luminance survey of the existing bridges and their surroundings. Our luminance surveys covered the entire length of the river between Albert Bridge and Tower Bridge. For such an extensive study we had to develop an inventive solution.
 

 

Maggie's Centre

Jewel Changi Airport

Our analysis methods are growing ever more complex, and for Safdie Architect’s Project Jewel they reached a new high – we modelled the light coming through each triangular cell of the roof, for each hour of the year. After parsing all this data, a frit pattern was applied in varying densities to modulate the light levels throughout the building.

With the largest indoor waterfall and one of the world’s largest conditioned gardens, Jewel Changi Airport is a destination in its own right. As the gateway to Singapore, the “City in a Garden”, it is no wonder that almost 15% of the total area in Project Jewel is given over to internal gardens. Balancing the competing demands of abundant heat and light needed for plants, and superior passenger thermal comfort for people was one of the project’s key challenges.
 

 

Maggie's Centre

Maggie’s Centre

The centre was built as a refuge for the Royal Oldham Hospital cancer patients, a careful choice of materials and lighting creates a sense of calm and homely sensation. The building appears to float effortlessly above a tranquil garden; a central glazed void in the midst of the open plan layout brings light and trees into the heart of the building.

The desire to create calm and welcoming spaces shaped our lighting philosophy. Many cancer patients are sensitive to direct light and the colour of reflected light needs to be carefully considered in order to avoid making patient’s skin look unnecessarily unhealthy. For this reason, concealed, warm light sources were used throughout. This approach complements the tulipwood finishes and, when combined with decorative elements, creates a striking yet homely atmosphere far from what may usually be expected in a healthcare facility.

 

The first twenty five years:

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